Video-urile de mai jos sunt realizate de Universitatea Nottingham in scop educational. Pacientii sunt actori.


 

In this film, you see a GP talking to a patient who has repeatedly presented to the surgery for abdominal problems for which no organic cause has been found. The GP asks the patients at length about her symptoms. The information is already in the GP notes, but the GP knows that if the patient is to trust the advice given, she must first feel that the history has been heard and understood by the new doctor.

It is apparent that the symptoms are more problematic when the patient is lonely, and also apparent that her social life has greatly reduced since the problems began. The patient thinks that she has a medical problem which doctors have not yet diagnosed, and she requests more tests. Despite pressure, the GP holds firm that further tests are not needed. The GP avoids getting into an argument about whether the problems are physical or psychological by suggesting that both these factors may be contributing.

The GP then suggests that as the attempts at treatment so far have not worked, they might want to try a different approach for a few months, as a trial. The patient remains cynical, but does at least agree to come and see the GP again.

In conditions such as somatisation, it can be helpful for the patient to see the same doctor so that unnecessary tests can be avoided.

Please note that this video has been made by the University of Nottingham for teaching purposes. The psychiatrist is a real psychiatrist but the patient is played by an actor.


 

In this film, you see a psychiatrist who works in the liaison psychiatry department seeing a patient who has recently been treated in the emergency department for wrist lacerations. The lacerations were self-inflicted after a relationship ended.

The patient describes an emotional response to the end of a relatively short-lived relationship. She also gives a history of cutting since her teenage years and she is aware that she uses cutting to manage difficult emotions. She describes very low self-esteem and also some past alcohol misuse and binge/purge behaviours. She gives an account of hearing voices that are inside her head. There appears to be a pattern in her relationships of rapid attachment and then a strong sense of abandonment when they end. Towards the end of the interview, the patient appears to re-play this pattern in her relationship with the psychiatrist. However, the psychiatrist maintains a firm boundary.

This patient displays features of Emotionally Unstable Personality Disorder of the Borderline type. We may speculate that the origins of her problems lie in her childhood experiences.

Please note that this video has been made by the University of Nottingham for teaching purposes. The psychiatrist is a real psychiatrist but the patient is played by an actor.


In this film, an on-call psychiatrist is assessing a young man who has been referred urgently by his GP. The psychiatrist takes a history in which she elicits persecutory delusions, third person auditory hallucinations, running commentary, thought insertion, and somatic hallucinations. She then makes a risk assessment, takes a drug history and assesses risk.

The patient is clearly suffering from a psychotic disorder and the most likely diagnosis is schizophrenia. Differential diagnoses would include a drug-induced psychosis.

Please note that this video has been made by the University of Nottingham for teaching purposes. The psychiatrist is a real psychiatrist but the patient is played by an actor.


In this film, a psychiatrist assesses a man who has been referred by his GP. The patient demonstrates flight of ideas, pressure of speech, disinhibition, punning, grandiose delusions, and second person auditory hallucinations. His presentation is consistent with mania.

Please note that this video has been made by the University of Nottingham for teaching purposes. The psychiatrist is a real psychiatrist but the patient is played by an actor.


In this film, the GP is seeing a patient who has a depressive disorder. The patient describes symptoms including low mood, tearfulness, reduced energy, reduced motivation, early morning wakening, loss of appetite, weight loss, poor concentration, reduced enjoyment and reduced interest in self-care.

The GP explores the effect of the symptoms on other people in the patient’s life, explores the past history of low mood, and makes an assessment of suicide risk. The GP then gives the patient an explanation of depression.

Please note that this video has been made by the University of Nottingham for teaching purposes. The psychiatrist is a real psychiatrist but the patient is played by an actor.


In this film, the GP is seeing a patient who has presented several times before with complaints of palpitations and shortness of breath.

The patient describes the onset of her problems, which was a panic attack. She has then gone on to develop agoraphobia. The problem has affected a number of areas of her life.

The GP explores the patient’s understanding of the problem and it is apparent that she has attributed this to a problem with her heart. The GP then goes on to give the patient an alternative explanation; that this is anxiety. She describes the physiological symptoms of anxiety and explains why avoidance is a problem.

Please note that this video has been made by the University of Nottingham for teaching purposes. The psychiatrist is a real psychiatrist but the patient is played by an actor.

Psih. Mădălina Simion
Urmareste

Psih. Mădălina Simion

Psiholog clinician at NeuroPedi
Psiholog clinician cu experienta in testarea psihologica si neuropsihologica a copiilor si adolescentilor cu afectiuni ale sistemului nervos (tumori cerebrale, epilepsie, hidrocefalie, traumatisme cranio-cerebrale etc)
Psih. Mădălina Simion
Urmareste

Website pentru promovarea neuropsihologiei

PSIHOLOGIE CLINICA | NEUROPSIHOLOGIE © 2013 - 2017

Copy Protected by Chetan's WP-Copyprotect.